CSL 1.0 demo

With the citeproc-js processor nearing completion, I’ve finally gotten
around to hooking it up to a web page with a little sample data.
Firefox only (for the E4X dependency), and you’ll find it’s slow to
load (348k of code and data, plus it encapsulates the XML for the
styles in JSON, and builds the processor from scratch four times –
bad design, I know, it’s a demo). The page really only scratches the
surface of what CSL 1.0 and the processor will be capable of when
fired in anger, but it’s a bit of fun nonetheless. There are some
notes at the end that point out some of the finer details.

For anyone interested in taking a look:
http://gsl-nagoya-u.net/http/pub/citeproc-demo/demo.html

Sorry for the extra traffic, but I was pleased to see this stuff in
rendered form at last, and wanted to share the experience.

Frank

Hi Frank,

I tested out your CSL demo site, pretty cool! So then I couldn’t resist running the same data through my PHP version so see what would happen and the results are shown below. As I mentioned earlier on this list, I’m not doing any sorting internally yet, so the list is just formatted in the order provided. There are still a few little issues to work out (“and” before litteral name), but it’s getting there.

I had a few questions for you…

  1. I thought that chicago had a hanging indent, but your rendering doesn’t seem to show that.
  2. Where are you getting your Journal abbreviations from?
  3. How do you deal with multilingual entries (the fifth item in the list below)

Cheers,

Ron.________________________________

D’Arcus, Bruce. Boundaries of Dissent: Protest and State Power in the Media Age. Routledge, 2005.
The apostrophe in Bruce’s name appears in proper typeset form.

Bennett, Frank G. ¡°Getting Property Right: “Informal” Mortgages in the Japanese Courts¡±. Pacific Rim Law & Policy Journal 18 (August 2009): 463-509.
Note the flip-flop behavior of the quotations marks around “informal” in the title of this citation. This works for quotation marks in any style locale. Oh, and, uh, these notes illustrate the formatting of annotated bibliographies (!).

Zelle, Rintze M., Hulster, Erik, Kloezen, Wendy, Pronk, Jack T., and Maris, Antonius J.A. ¡°Key Process Conditions for Production of C4 Dicarboxylic Acids in Bioreactor Batch Cultures of an Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain¡±. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 76, no. 3 (February 2010): 744-750.
This cite illustrates the rich text formatting capabilities in the new processor, as well as page range collapsing (in this case, applying the collapsing method required by the Chicago Manual of Style). Also, as the IEEE example above partially illustrates, we also offer robust handling of particles such as “van” and “de” in author names.

Razlogova, Elena. ¡°Radio and Astonishment: The Emergence of Radio Sound, 1920-1926¡±, May 2002.
All styles in the CSL repository are supported by the new processor, including the popular Chicago styles by Elena.

—|Ìï, ½«Ë¾, :ja-alalc97: Kajita, Shoji, ½ÇËù, ¿¼, :ja-alalc97: Kakusho, Takashi, ÖНÉ, ºVÖ¾, :ja-alalc97: Nakazawa, Atsushi, Öñ´å, ÖÎÐÛ, et al. Letter. ¸ßµÈ½ÌÓý™Cév¤Ë¤ª¤±¤ë´ÎÊÀ´ú½ÌÓýѧÁ•Ö§Ô®¥×¥é¥Ã¥È¥Õ¥©©`¥à¤Î˜‹ºB¤ËÏò¤±¤Æ :ja-alalc97: K¨­t¨­ ky¨­iku ni okeru jisedai ky¨­iku gakush¨± shien puratto f¨­mu no k¨­chiku ni mukete :en: Toward the Development of Next-Generation Platforms for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education. In ÈÕ±¾½ÌÓý¹¤Ñ§»áՓÎÄÕI, 31:297-305 31, no. 3 (December 2007): 297-305.
Note the transformations to which this cite is subjected in the samples above, and the fact that it appears in the correct sort position in all rendered forms. Selection of multi-lingual content can be configured in the style, permitting one database to serve a multi-lingual author in all languages in which she might publish.

Malone, Nolan J., and U.S. Bureau of the CensusNolan J. Evaluating Components of International Migration: Consistency of 2000 Nativity Data. Routledge, 2001.
This cite illustrates the formatting of institutional authors. Note that there is no “and” between the individual author and the institution with which he is affiliated.

Hi Frank,

I tested out your CSL demo site, pretty cool! So then I couldn’t resist
running the same data through my PHP version so see what would happen and
the results are shown below. As I mentioned earlier on this list, I’m not
doing any sorting internally yet, so the list is just formatted in the order
provided. There are still a few little issues to work out (“and” before
litteral name), but it’s getting there.

Looks good! Step by step; the little things can take a surprising
amount of effort to get right.

The handling of institutional names is beyond the scope of CSL 1.0,
but our students cite a lot of NGO material that needs this form of
citation, so I snuck this in. The processor supports a proposal for
institutional names that does not interfere with other aspects of
names handling, based on a proposal pending for CSL 1.1:

http://groups.google.com/group/zotero-legal/web/proposal-institution-names

Since the proposed extension won’t violate any other expectations, the
processor patches some “safe” nodes into the XML of the style:

http://bitbucket.org/fbennett/citeproc-js/src/tip/src/xmle4x.js#cl-208

It works pretty much as described in the doc, except that I’ve
reversed the expected ordering of names to make the input format more
intuitive: affiliated authors come before their institution, just as
they do in a cite, and any free agents (a pretty rare case) come at
the end, after institution names.

I had a few questions for you…

I thought that chicago had a hanging indent, but your rendering doesn’t seem
to show that.

The processor just sends a flag for this in a separate data fork,
along with the string data, and I forgot it was in there. It’s up to
the application to handle the flag; in this case, it will need
on-the-fly editing of the browser CSS. I’ll try to fix that soon.

Where are you getting your Journal abbreviations from?

I just made them up. :wink: There are various lists around, but no
uniform solution that covers all journals in all fields of study.
I’ve just built the processor to accept pluggable lists, in a sort of
a build it and they will come kind of a strategy. There’s a
discussion of the issues in the Zotero forums:

How do you deal with multilingual entries (the fifth item in the list below)

That’s a pure extension on my part, and not a part of CSL. I work in
Japan, and there is a lot of mixed-language publishing here, so I
built this bit into the processor as a proof of concept. The API for
it is described in the processor manual, and there’s a discussion
thread in the Zotero forums:

http://gsl-nagoya-u.net/http/pub/citeproc-doc.html#id25

Frank2010/3/13 Jerome, Ron <@Jerome_Ron>: