Short form names with suffixes

For the processor demo page, I made an adjustment in citeproc-js to
drop the “, Jr.” suffix from my name in the short form, because it
looked odd to me. This diverges from the specification, and I was
going to beg for an exception. But when I checked Chicago, I was
disappointed to find that I’m not exceptional:***
15.19 “Jr.,” “Sr.,” and the like

The abbreviations Jr. and Sr., as well as roman or arabic numerals
such as II or 3rd, after a person’s name are part of the name and so
are retained in connection with any titles or honorifics. Note that
these abbreviations are used only with the full name, never with the
surname only. See also 6.49, 9.47.

Mrs. James Jefferson Sr. spoke first. After Mrs. Jefferson had sat down, . . .
Dexter Harrison III, MD, spoke last. In closing, Dr. Harrison reiterated . . .


The examples given are of names used in running text, not in
citations, but “never” seems pretty emphatic. (The refs to 6.49 and
9.47 concern punctuation only; this is the sole guidance in CMS on
long and short forms with this kind of name.)

The CSL specification currently requires retention of the suffix in
the short form (http://citationstyles.org/downloads/specification.html#name-part-order,
“Display order of latin/Cyrillic names” -> “form set to ‘short’”.
Unless there is a strong counter-example, might this be amended?

Frank

as far as I see, there is another divergence with regards to suffixes
in the long format too. The specification reports

[Martinière] [III], [Gérard] [de] [la]

while nameorder_LongNameAsSortDemoteNever.txt and
nameorder_LongNameAsSortDemoteDisplayAndSort.txt put the suffix at the
end.

What should the testsuite result be?

Andrea

For the processor demo page, I made an adjustment in citeproc-js to
drop the “, Jr.” suffix from my name in the short form, because it
looked odd to me. This diverges from the specification, and I was
going to beg for an exception. But when I checked Chicago, I was
disappointed to find that I’m not exceptional:


15.19 “Jr.,” “Sr.,” and the like

The abbreviations Jr. and Sr., as well as roman or arabic numerals
such as II or 3rd, after a person’s name are part of the name and so
are retained in connection with any titles or honorifics. Note that
these abbreviations are used only with the full name, never with the
surname only. See also 6.49, 9.47.

Mrs. James Jefferson Sr. spoke first. After Mrs. Jefferson had sat down, . . .
Dexter Harrison III, MD, spoke last. In closing, Dr. Harrison reiterated . . .


The examples given are of names used in running text, not in
citations, but “never” seems pretty emphatic. (The refs to 6.49 and
9.47 concern punctuation only; this is the sole guidance in CMS on
long and short forms with this kind of name.)

The CSL specification currently requires retention of the suffix in
the short form (http://citationstyles.org/downloads/specification.html#name-part-order,
“Display order of latin/Cyrillic names” -> “form set to ‘short’”.
Unless there is a strong counter-example, might this be amended?

as far as I see, there is another divergence with regards to suffixes
in the long format too. The specification reports

[Martinière] [III], [Gérard] [de] [la]

while nameorder_LongNameAsSortDemoteNever.txt and
nameorder_LongNameAsSortDemoteDisplayAndSort.txt put the suffix at the
end.

What should the testsuite result be?

The test suite gives the correct form. It’s covered by a revision to
the specification is in the works, along with the change to short
forms (it’s checked into the tip, but hasn’t yet been released).

http://bitbucket.org/bdarcus/csl-docs/src/tip/specification.txt#cl-1009

Frank