do any CSL tools do code inspection of formatted citations?

Are there any tools that inspect an outputted CSL formatted citation,
and show which parts of the CSL code was responsible for that bit of
formatting, kind of like being able to inspect an element in a web
browser?

I’m assuming not, but I wanted to check.

Mendeley Limited | London, UK | www.mendeley.com
Registered in England and Wales | Company Number 6419015

I’m not sure, but think that …

  1. Simon’s is related:

https://github.com/simonster/csl-inference

  1. Sylvester may have mentioned his code could extended fairly easily
    to do this (?):

https://github.com/inukshuk/anystyle-parser

Bruce

Are there any tools that inspect an outputted CSL formatted citation,
and show which parts of the CSL code was responsible for that bit of
formatting, kind of like being able to inspect an element in a web
browser?

I’m assuming not, but I wanted to check.

I’m not sure, but think that …

  1. Simon’s is related:

https://github.com/simonster/csl-inference

  1. Sylvester may have mentioned his code could extended fairly easily
    to do this (?):

https://github.com/inukshuk/anystyle-parser

Bruce

Sorry for being slow to respond. citeproc-js can’t do this currently.
I’ve thought about it, but it seems it would be difficult to implement
into citeproc-js. Other implementations may be more well positioned
for it.

Frank

We discussed a feature like this in order to generate training data; Carles (Mendeley) used a patched version of citeproc-js to add annotations, but I’m not sure that the results were completely satisfactory. In any case, it’s on my list of features for the next citeproc-ruby iteration.

Sylvester

Hi,On 21 February 2012 09:34, Sylvester Keil <@Sylvester_Keil> wrote:

We discussed a feature like this in order to generate training data; Carles (Mendeley) used a patched version of citeproc-js to add annotations, but I’m not sure that the results were completely satisfactory. In any case, it’s on my list of features for the next citeproc-ruby iteration.

sadly, the results weren’t completely satisfactory :frowning:

It was enough for my use case and after lot of tweaking (call it:
post-processing after the citeproc-js+patched output). But could not
be used for other cases like the style editor.

We talked about it with Frank and this is hard to do with citeproc-js,
like Frank has said in this thread.

Frank Bennett <@Frank_Bennett> writes:

Are there any tools that inspect an outputted CSL formatted citation,
and show which parts of the CSL code was responsible for that bit of
formatting, kind of like being able to inspect an element in a web
browser?

I’m assuming not, but I wanted to check.

I’m not sure, but think that …

  1. Simon’s is related:

https://github.com/simonster/csl-inference

  1. Sylvester may have mentioned his code could extended fairly easily
    to do this (?):

https://github.com/inukshuk/anystyle-parser

Bruce

Sorry for being slow to respond. citeproc-js can’t do this currently.
I’ve thought about it, but it seems it would be difficult to implement
into citeproc-js. Other implementations may be more well positioned
for it.

In citeproc-hs implementing something like this should be easy but
tedious – well, it depends on how you would do it. Even now it is
possible to generate an intermediate representation of a formatted
citation from which it is not difficult to infer the part of CSL that
produced it.

Something like this is among my long term plans for a major rewrite of
the processor I have in mind, but it has a very low priority in my to-do
list for the time being.

Andrea