Proposal: fragment item type

Office staff in our university (and many others) need to provide
certain documents in multiple languages. A CSL processor with
multilingual capabilities could be leveraged for this purpose, by
treating blocks of text as in-text citations consisting only of a
block of text, drawn from the “note” variable.

An item type “fragment” would allow such functionality to be mixed
into a standard in-text citation style, without interfering with
citation formatting.

I’m not really understanding the use case explanation, but it sounds
like it’s a) out of scope for CSL, and b) easy enough to achieve in
other ways.

Care to clarify further?

Bruce

Office staff in our university (and many others) need to provide
certain documents in multiple languages. A CSL processor with
multilingual capabilities could be leveraged for this purpose, by
treating blocks of text as in-text citations consisting only of a
block of text, drawn from the “note” variable.

An item type “fragment” would allow such functionality to be mixed
into a standard in-text citation style, without interfering with
citation formatting.

I’m not really understanding the use case explanation, but it sounds
like it’s a) out of scope for CSL, and b) easy enough to achieve in
other ways.

Easy solutions are the name of the game. Thoughts on (b)?

Office staff in our university (and many others) need to provide
certain documents in multiple languages. A CSL processor with
multilingual capabilities could be leveraged for this purpose, by
treating blocks of text as in-text citations consisting only of a
block of text, drawn from the “note” variable.

An item type “fragment” would allow such functionality to be mixed
into a standard in-text citation style, without interfering with
citation formatting.

I’m not really understanding the use case explanation, but it sounds
like it’s a) out of scope for CSL,

Out of scope, yes; these are not citations. It’s a small tweak to the
schema that we could implement locally, if it’s not suitable for
inclusion.

and b) easy enough to achieve in
other ways.

Easy solutions are the name of the game. Thoughts on (b)?

Care to clarify further?

For a very simple example, office staff might have a document like this:On Fri, Nov 26, 2010 at 7:23 AM, Frank Bennett <@Frank_Bennett> wrote:

On Fri, Nov 26, 2010 at 7:20 AM, Bruce D’Arcus <@Bruce_D_Arcus1> wrote:

On Thu, Nov 25, 2010 at 5:03 PM, Frank Bennett <@Frank_Bennett> wrote:


2010-10-23


Notice

The elevators will be out of service for routine maintenance on July
15, between 9:00am and 11:00am


Office staff that are not fully versed in all languages of the local
community desire a means of issuing notices like this one, as well as
somewhat more complex documents, in multiple languages.

I have to understand the need better. What exactly are they trying to
achieve?On Nov 25, 2010 5:23 PM, “Frank Bennett” <@Frank_Bennett> wrote:

On Fri, Nov 26, 2010 at 7:20 AM, Bruce D’Arcus <@Bruce_D_Arcus1> wrote:

On Thu, Nov 25, 2010 at 5:03 PM, Frank Bennett <@Frank_Bennett> wrote:

Office staff in our university (and many others) need to provide
certain documents in multiple languages. A CSL processor with
multilingual capabilities could be leveraged for this purpose, by
treating blocks of text as in-text citations consisting only of a
block of text, drawn from the “note” variable.

An item type “fragment” would allow such functionality to be mixed
into a standard in-text citation style, without interfering with
citation formatting.

I’m not really understanding the use case explanation, but it sounds
like it’s a) out of scope for CSL, and b) easy enough to achieve in
other ways.

Easy solutions are the name of the game. Thoughts on (b)?

Care to clarify further?

Bruce


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For a very simple example, office staff might have a document like this:


2010-10-23


Notice

The elevators will be out of service for routine maintenance on July
15, between 9:00am and 11:00am


Office staff that are not fully versed in all languages of the local
community desire a means of issuing notices like this one, as well as
somewhat more complex documents, in multiple languages.

So relevant fragments might be “The elevators will be out of service
for routine maintenance”?

And the languages in question are close enough that one could
effectively have a document field like “elevators-out-service” and
"date" and “time” it would work?

Finally, what sort of software are they using to create the announcements?

Bruce

For a very simple example, office staff might have a document like this:


2010-10-23


Notice

The elevators will be out of service for routine maintenance on July
15, between 9:00am and 11:00am


Office staff that are not fully versed in all languages of the local
community desire a means of issuing notices like this one, as well as
somewhat more complex documents, in multiple languages.

So relevant fragments might be “The elevators will be out of service
for routine maintenance”?

I’m thinking that, for simplicity, documents would just be built out
of entire style blocks (so the whole paragraph, in this case).
Adjustments to dates and whatnot could be twiddled into the text of
the local document, after the system supplies the basic content.

And the languages in question are close enough that one could
effectively have a document field like “elevators-out-service” and
"date" and “time” it would work?

Finally, what sort of software are they using to create the announcements?

All office paper here runs in Microsoft Word.

My idea for implementation is that, if text blocks are pulled from
individual Zotero entries, and the master document itself is also
referenced in Zotero item (and stored there as an attachment for
general use), it would be a simple thing to build a plugin that taps
into the citeproc-js item registry (when the document is refreshed),
and updates the bidirectional links on the text blocks and the master
document. That way, staff could pretty much prepare documents in the
normal way, but if in Zotero they run a search for, say, “elevator”
(or the equivalent term in Japanese), they could then use the
"Related" links to quickly identify master documents that use that
term.

I’ll admit that all of this is beyond the scope of citation
management. If there are other tools that will serve the same purpose
better, we should look there – I may be suffering from the “All I
have is a hammer, so everything looks like a nail” fallacy. But with
Zotero’s content management features and a library shared among
administrators, it does seem as though one could build quite a
powerful document system with relatively little effort.

While I don’t have much personal experience with it, I understand that
Word has pretty powerful field and custom workflow support. I’d think
that would be better suited to this use case. I imagine maybe a power
"memo" or “announcement” template where a user could selected a type
from some drop-down, the rest of the document creation would be
prompted (date, etc.), and when done, it could automatically create
the different language versions.

Bruce

For a very simple example, office staff might have a document like this:


2010-10-23


Notice

The elevators will be out of service for routine maintenance on July
15, between 9:00am and 11:00am


Office staff that are not fully versed in all languages of the local
community desire a means of issuing notices like this one, as well as
somewhat more complex documents, in multiple languages.

So relevant fragments might be “The elevators will be out of service
for routine maintenance”?

I’m thinking that, for simplicity, documents would just be built out
of entire style blocks (so the whole paragraph, in this case).
Adjustments to dates and whatnot could be twiddled into the text of
the local document, after the system supplies the basic content.

And the languages in question are close enough that one could
effectively have a document field like “elevators-out-service” and
"date" and “time” it would work?

Finally, what sort of software are they using to create the announcements?

All office paper here runs in Microsoft Word.

While I don’t have much personal experience with it, I understand that
Word has pretty powerful field and custom workflow support. I’d think
that would be better suited to this use case. I imagine maybe a power
"memo" or “announcement” template where a user could selected a type
from some drop-down, the rest of the document creation would be
prompted (date, etc.), and when done, it could automatically create
the different language versions.

Thanks, I’ll pass that along to the powers that be.

Hi,On 25 November 2010 23:23, Bruce D’Arcus <@Bruce_D_Arcus1> wrote:

While I don’t have much personal experience with it, I understand that
Word has pretty powerful field and custom workflow support. I’d think
that would be better suited to this use case. I imagine maybe a power
"memo" or “announcement” template where a user could selected a type
from some drop-down, the rest of the document creation would be
prompted (date, etc.), and when done, it could automatically create
the different language versions.

or a web system generating a PDF at the end after answering some questions?
(probably a desktop based solution is preferred here, but who knows)

Hi,

While I don’t have much personal experience with it, I understand that
Word has pretty powerful field and custom workflow support. I’d think
that would be better suited to this use case. I imagine maybe a power
"memo" or “announcement” template where a user could selected a type
from some drop-down, the rest of the document creation would be
prompted (date, etc.), and when done, it could automatically create
the different language versions.

or a web system generating a PDF at the end after answering some questions?
(probably a desktop based solution is preferred here, but who knows)

The general concept is to deploy some kind of poor man’s Trados that
is accessible to office staff with a minimum of training.